It is often acknowledged that innovation and initiative come from groundswell movements. It is important for society and organisations to leverage these opportunities. One particular example of a ground-up movement is the Irish “Blood Bike” organisation. This is a bottom-up initiative of motor-bike enthusiasts in Ireland, who assist the health services by providing timely courier services for blood and other patient care support.

There are seven Blood Bike groups organised in Ireland, based all around the country (East, Leinster, South, West, Mid-West, North West, and Cú Chulainn Blood Bikes). These regional groups are completely self-organised and driven by nothing more than the initiative and creativity of local Irish bikers.

I have ridden motorcycles ever since I could legally have a driving license, so luck struck when my hobby and interests crossed paths with the local Cork “Blood Bike South” group. That good fortune enabled me to find another outlet (or excuse!) for jumping on a motorbike, and it afforded the grounds-up initiative of Blood Bike South, to support more services for the Irish healthcare system.

The service is provided completely by volunteers, with this groundswell from Irish motorcycle riders having significantly contributed to courier cost savings for the health service. More importantly, the service has undoubtedly saved lives because of the timely door-to-door courier service, and is an example where a local idea and initiative can grow to become a country-wide valuable service.

In addition to the Blood Bike movement, Aspira and its staff regularly volunteer for a number of other organisations in various sectors and recognise the importance of giving back to the community.

Author: Jim Blair, Director of Software Services, Aspira

 

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