10 reasons employees should bring their dogs to work

10 reasons employees should bring their dogs to work

Dogs are everyone’s best friend. Our four-legged friends work alongside us every day, but it seems this is forgotten. Police dogs catch criminals while service dogs assist their owners to live independently. Dogs have many roles working alongside their humans. But, the most important job of all, dogs are companions, best friends and family members. They make people’s lives better with their unconditional love. You can celebrate that on Take Your Dog To Work Day on June 23.

In a modern world, with many hours spent at work, dogs get left at home while employees earn a living. Pet Sitters International started Take Your Dog To Work Day in 1996 to encourage employers to allow dogs at work.

 

Here are 10 ways dogs make the perfect resource partners.

Boosts employee morale

Dogs are dependable, reliable, optimistic and have an unquestioning willingness to do what you ask. They alert staff to problems and are always happy to see you. Dogs in the workplace improves staff productivity because their best friend by their side.

Increases teamwork

Dogs invite interaction and help form strong bonds among staff. They are great for breaking the ice. People are more likely to talk to each other when someone has a dog. Employees can find common ground over dogs. This can cut down office gossip because they are too busy discussing dog stories.

Promotes good health

The added bonus of dogs in the workplace is that it forces employees to take breaks. Staff have to walk them for a good 10-minutes a few times a day. This promotes a healthy work life balance during the day.

More employee flexibility

Many people cannot wait to leave work to get home to their pooch. Their pet has been locked up, alone all day and need their human’s time at the end of the day. Dogs are part of employees’ families, so allowing them in the workplace removes the need for staff to rush off. Employees will be more flexible with their time if their best friend is by their side rather than waiting for them to get home. What a great way to increase productivity.

Financial benefits

Bringing their dogs to work has huge financial benefits for employees and costs the company very little. No longer will employees have to pay for dog walking services or doggy day care if their dog is at work every day.

Attract the best people

People think of their dogs as part of the family.  Potential employees may prefer a company that allows dogs at work over a company with a no dog policy.

Improve the company image

Dogs in the workplace improve a company’s image. Clients will see the company as forward-thinking and progressive. Being able to interact with pets when they visit, will boost your clients’ sense of wellbeing. It helps them relax and enjoying visiting your workplace.

Relieves stress

Dogs are natural stress relievers. They are sensitive to your needs. When you need to blow off steam, they are ready to play. They will snuggle close when you feel down and need a quiet moment. A dog friendly workplace relieves employee stress and encourages harmony, which, in turn, increases productivity each day.

Reduce staff turnover

Staff turnover is a huge problem for employers. It costs time and money to get new hires up to speed. Workplaces with a ‘bring your dog to work’ policy encourages people to stay rather than risk not being able to bring their dog to work somewhere else. This is a great perk to keep staff loyal to organisations.

Pets reduce employee sick days

Dog owners do not want to leave their pets at home while they go to work. Employees can call in sick or leave work early to attend to their pet’s needs. Allowing pets in the workplace eliminates this problem.

At Aspira we understand the problems of resourcing your projects. We can help boost your business to achieve your vision. Contact Aspira to found out how – www.aspira.ie.

 

A Problem Shared Is A Problem Halved?

 

We’ve all heard the saying ‘A Problem Shared Is a Problem Halved’, but when it comes to Project Management is this really the case?

 

As a Project Manager, and a Mentor to other Project Managers, I often jokingly remark that my job can be that of a ‘PM Counsellor’. I meet with my clients for an hour at a time and, swapping a reclining couch for a Gantt Chart or Risk Log, discuss their most recent project woes, challenges and achievements. More often than not, whilst working together in this manner, we unearth potential solutions where there may initially have appeared to be none.

 

Over time, working with clients of varying levels of seniority and experience across many different industries, one observation has cropped up again and again. Sometimes simply the exercise of articulating a problem to an impartial third party can be just what is needed to gain perspective on a particular situation or challenge. In my own experience I’ve found that by providing a non-judgemental, supportive environment to the Project Managers I meet, they often answer their own questions in the process. Having neutral, unbiased support where there’s no judgement on the proverbial ‘stupid question’ can make it a lot easier to come to a satisfactory solution to the challenges that face every project.

 

When I reflect on my own career progression as a Project Manager I realise now that I may not always have leveraged the vast wealth of knowledge and experience of the people around me. There were occasions when I could have found a simple answer to a question, if only I had just asked someone on my team who I trust. So for those of you who are new to Project Management, or more experienced people who maybe too slow to ask for help, here are some tips to help you on your way:

 

  • Use your Team! Delivering a project is a collaborative effort and your project team are in it with you. Each member of the project team will have different areas of expertise and experience so don’t underestimate the knowledge which is readily available to you.
  • Talk to other Project Managers in your organisation – chances are they’ve faced similar challenges before and have the scars to prove it. I’ve yet to meet a PM who doesn’t love to be the Superman or Wonder Woman of project management solutions, and they will be happy to share their experiences.
  • Find someone independent to your project that you trust to give an unbiased opinion. When faced with a difficult decision, maybe treat them to a coffee and talk through the challenge with them. Often you’ll know what the best course of action might be, but saying it out loud, could be just what you need to gain a better perspective on the situation.
  • Get a Mentor – in addition to giving advice based on their own experience, a mentor will help you develop your strengths as a Project Manager and can introduce you to a network of people who may help your career progression in general.
  • Join a Project Management Community – forums like the PMI Chapter in your area or the various Online Groups that sites like LinkedIn provide, are excellent opportunities to meet your peers in both social and professional environments.

 

As the now iconic British Telecom ads of the early 1990s endorsed, “It’s good to talk”. Make this your motto as you navigate your career in Project Management.

For more information on Aspira’s Project Management Mentoring & Coaching Services please contact info@aspira.ie

 

Author:  Emma Daly, Project Services Director, Aspira.

The 1% Better VoxPop @ The Project Management Institute – Ireland National Conference

http://robofthegreen.ie/episodes/episode-15-pmi-ireland-voxpop/

Oh yes, it’s back by popular demand!!! The 1% Better VoxPop!!

After making its debut a couple of weeks ago, and (for the most part) being well received, it’s coming back for another airing (literally). This time round, we’re going full Project Management style with the show….and combining it with the 1% Better theme!!

I recorded this show during the PMI Ireland National Conference at the Aviva Stadium on May 4th 2017. This was an action packed conference with a great selection of speakers and over 350 attendees.

Project Management is something I think we all do in one way or another. We all plan a bit, take and manage risks, create To-Do lists and ultimately want to get value or benefits from what we do with our time & resources (sorry for all the PM lingo). So, to prove this, I asked a random selection of the guests a 1% Better question relating to Project Management!!

After much consideration and debate (with myself), the question I landed on asks to what one (or two things) do you (the guest) do from the world of Project Management that you bring into your day to day personal life that adds a little bit of value, organises the chaos and makes things 1% better! This was a bit of fun but it was interesting to hear the responses…some very similar and some quite different.

Overall it was a great day, lots of learnings from it and I was more than happy to do some 1% Better podcasting during the event for the PMI Ireland. As a member of the PMI-Ireland committee, I was playing a dual role but happy do so.

To learn a bit more about the PMI Ireland Chapter, go to the site here – https://pmi-ireland.org/

I hope you enjoy the PMI Ireland Vox Pop. If you do, please leave a rating or comment on iTunes or on the site (http://robofthegreen.ie/contact/)

Have a great day/weekend,

Rob

Where’s Me Jumper: Putting smarts into Project Management !

Everything seems to be upgrading to a smarter version these days. Even jackets ! with Google and Levis recently announcing a collaborative effort in the upcoming release of their smart jacket.  Surely the days of losing one’s jumper at 0300 am in various establishments may be finally coming to end, solving one of the first world’s most pressing problems. The notion of such everyday items becoming smarter lead me to ask what new smarts are out there that could be applied to project management.

To make it easier and more efficient for project managers to manage projects and not get lost in a sea of complexity and change, I believe there are many new smart ways to improve project management performance. For this short blog, I have picked some of the PMI knowledge areas to see where “smarts” could be applied.

Project Time Management.

A lot of people still use Excel to manager project schedules. MS Project has been around for a long time and could not be considered new, however the new versions of Project Online certainly does bring a lot to the party regarding smarter scheduling. Ms Project online now allows Enterprise resource management (essential in today’s project matrix organisations), Portfolio Optimization, Anytime and Anywhere access via Browsers, Dashboard reporting as well as integration into Skype for Business and enhanced SharePoint integration. One thing having such new tools, I always advise for anybody working on MS Project to also take the MS Project Certification exam to make the best of such tools and to improve your scheduling skills

Project Quality Management

We all know quality is critical to any project. Many folk again still use Excel to record and managed defects. I would strongly advise using either enterprise quality / defect tracking tools such as IBM Rational Rose, MS TFS or perhaps use one of the many cloud based defect tracking tools to ensure you have a systematic process for dealing with defects and issue resolution. One should also consider the use if automated testing tools such as Selenium / Cucumber / Jenkins to save testing cycle time and to ensure consistent tests where appropriated.

Project Communications Management.

In a previous blog on Project Management and the Self-Destructing Project Update, I noted how the impact of the various social media platforms outside of work are beginning to have an influence on communication within the work environment. Many organisations already have begun to use enterprise-grade social media, although these business-focused tools tend to be a little different to the tools that flourish in the wild. For example, Yammer is deployed as a business-focused alternative to Facebook; various Instant Messaging tools such as Skype for Business take the place of WhatsApp and enterprise tools such as SocialCast are found in organisations as a replacement for micro blogging tools such as Twitter. It is certainly worthwhile to consider the communication channels that one can use these days in a project and perhaps cater better for the new generation of project team members.

Project Risk Management

Sometimes it is not a case of using a shiny new tool. We can become smarter too by learning more about how to deal with certain aspects of project management. Most project managers keep risk registers, but they are often static documents or repositories.  Dealing with risk is one of the most important jobs in any project and to this end I would recommend people taking the PMI-RMP certification in order to best equip one’s self to deal with topics such as risk process facilitation, risk monitoring and control as well as specific risk analysis skills. Learning more about how to deal with risk will make you a much more valuable project manager.

There of course many other new tools and techniques out there to help make our projects smarter and thus delivering increased value and the key is to ensure that you are aware of latest industry trends and products and methodologies that might make sure that you don’t feel “lost” at the end of your project and keep an eye out for smart jumpers coming to a Christmas near you.

CAREERZOO 2017– 12 tips to make the most of your visit

Devise a plan for the day. Get there early. Select the top 10/15 companies you’d like to meet & visit them first. Early in the day is best to get recruiters attention. But also leave some time for “wild cards”.

Dress smart. What you wear is important. Job fairs are typically big events with a lot of people, and you’ll stand out by looking good.

CV’s. Print the amount you think you’ll need & double it !

Do your research.  The more you know about the organisation and the types of positions they hire for, the better you will come across to the employer. Aspira’s Resourcing Manager, Russell Moore says, “Surprise companies with your knowledge, and impress them with the initiative you took to research the company’s mission, purpose, and typical clients.”

Don’t ask questions that you can find answers to online. Ask recruiters to elaborate on information you’ve learned from your research instead of. Mention something you’ve read online about a new product or a new initiative.

Make an impression. Be enthusiastic. Demonstrate your interest with a firm handshake, good eye contact, a smile, and a good conversation with the company representative.

Remember this is networking. Collect as many business cards as possible and make a good first impression. When it’s time to apply for an open position, you can stand out by referencing that connection in your cover letter or introduction email.

Be prepared to answer questions about yourself. Be concise; you don’t have much time to make your impression before the recruiter is on to the next person. “Sell yourself but keep it brief. Describe your skills and where possible, relevant work experience.” says Philip McGillycuddy, Head of Business Development at Aspira

Keep your ear to the ground. Listen to everyone around you. If you find yourself waiting in line to speak with an employer, make your time count.

Take notes on the stand. You’re going to be speaking to a lot of different people – you will not remember every conversation. Take the worry of having to recall details by taking notes.

Check your phone. Sometimes employers might have follow up questions for you. If they do, that’s usually a good sign – do you want to miss out because you missed a call?

Follow up after the event. Be prepared to follow up with the recruiters after you meet them. Ask for a business card, and send thank you emails.

Created by:      Philip McGillycuddy

Company:        Aspira

Position:          Head of Business Development

World Recognised Project Management

If you could have a qualification with the power to open doors for you into multiple industries as diverse as IT to Engineering to Big Pharma and more, in any country across the world where you wish to work, would you let that opportunity pass you by? Neither would we.

 

Not everyone is cut out to be a project manager. It takes a certain level of determination, grit and sheer force of will to oversee and guide a long and complex set of interdependent tasks to completion inside an allocated budget. This is what makes it so fulfilling as a career. Great project managers are detail-oriented, have excellent organisational and perceptive, pragmatic planning skills.
 

For driven individuals wanting to embark on project management as a career, the time is definitely now. Project management job opportunities are plentiful and the supply never seems to meet the demand. That’s why it’s such a bankable and dependable career choice.

 

However, it is absolutely essential to have a professional – and industry recognisable – credential to your name to secure a lucrative role in Project Management. When it comes to Project Management training; what differentiates Aspira from all the rest is simply this: our training is more than a credential – it is effective, insightful and will give you actual techniques and templates to work with in your project management career. That’s why Aspira’s project management training is such a beneficial device to help enhance your ability to make the transition into project management.

 

Our industry experts have crafted a diverse set of project management course options which cater specifically to the differing needs of those in search of powerful incisive training. Whether you are looking for an introduction to project management essentials or become a recognised Project Management Professional (PMPTM) certified by the PMITM, or are looking to train your staff to be the best Agile Scrummasters on the market, Aspira has precisely what you need in our range of project management training options

 

All of our courses use the latest edition (5th Edition – March 2013) PMBOK Guide® as the core reference. By the end of our courses our trainees leave with a detailed understanding of Project Management terms, concepts and methodologies. Trainees are presented with real world project challenges providing opportunities to exercise their knowledge and skill before completing the course. Aspira project management training results in competent and confident project managers armed with all the skills and abilities required to effectively and methodically manage any project.
To talk to us today about the project management course that best suits your needs, you can contact us on: training@aspira.ie or direct call on: +353 21 235 2550

The Most Accurate Technology Prediction – Fifty Years On

The most accurate prediction in the field of computing was made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, then of Fairchild Semiconductor and later a founder of Intel.  He made the audacious suggestion that the density of transistors on integrated circuits would double every 18 months. Amazingly, device physicists and process engineers have managed to make good on Moore’s prediction over the past 50 years.

This exponential rate of progress – the fact that everything about computing continues to double at fixed intervals, is what makes it so difficult to predict the future of computing technology. There’s nothing else like this, in any other field. If transportation technology had improved at the same rate as information technology over the past 30 years, then a car would be the size of a mobile phone, cost €100, go 100,000 miles per hour, and travel 150,000 miles on a tank of fuel. A Boeing 747 would cost hundreds of dollars today, rather than hundreds of millions. Ridiculous? Not in computing, where today’s €500 laptop personal computer is vastly more capable than the $3 million building-sized institutional computer of just a few decades ago.

So what do we expect will happen over the next 2-5 years?  I believe Big Data will continue to drive consumer behavior and technology evolution.  The ability to manage, manipulate and interpret massive quantities of raw data in real-time, converting data into information, and Information into intelligence, is where our focus will need to be.

Secret of Scheduling Success

Take advantage of Aspira’s sharp scheduling consultants and get your project firmly established with the very best chance of success.  Our skilled and savvy team will assimilate your project data and investigate your ‘unknowns’ to draw together a realistic and achievable schedule.

Whether your project is large and complex or small and straightforward, our significant expertise in scheduling will ensure you protect your project against delays.

We take the hassle out of scheduling by taking control of its organisation. We conduct insightful workshops and interviews with key project stakeholders, project team members  and subject matter experts. We then feed this data along with critical information such as resource estimates, key dependencies and risks and project milestones to document a detailed project schedule.

Our Scheduling Package delivers:

• A complete and thorough Work Breakdown Structure which itemizes deliverable-oriented components of the project scope which are manageable and achievable in the timeframe allotted.
• A Critical Path which will highlight those key work components whose schedule absolutely must be met in order for the plan to stay on schedule, giving you clear milestones to meet and powerful insight to work with.
• A Key Milestone list, which empowers you to identify the most important deliverables to keep the project on track.
• Resource Estimates which will trim out over-staffing costs but ensure there is peak productivity with sufficient resources
• A RAID matrix: Risks, Assumptions, Issues and Dependencies which may all affect the completed plan.
• A Detailed Schedule which incorporates all the project data and allows you to track the target progress easily.

 

Aspira’s Scheduling has resulted in our clients being able to:
• Breakdown complex scope into manageable work components
• Create efficiency across the project ensuring resources are utilised to their max potential
• Protect projects against delay be ensuring key milestones are met.
• Allow Project Managers to see where parallel work items can be inserted into the schedule.
• Plan for resources to have all the assets and inputs they need to start their work components on time.
• Identify possible threats and risks to the project
• View impacts of any necessary change in project timeline or scope.
• Experiment with ‘what if’ scenarios to identify possible workarounds if project issues arise

Cork City & Aspira in Europe – Message from the Belgian Front

Aspira, the enterprise IT Company were unveiled early in 2016 as a principle sponsor of Cork City FC. This year has seen Cork City embark on a record-equaling run of victories in Europe, culminating in tonight’s historic 3rd round Europa Qualifier against KRC Genk with the first leg played at the Belgian team’s Luminus Arena tonight (televised live 7pm on eir Sport 1).

Aspira’s support for Cork City FC means they’ll do whatever they can to give the team an edge. This week they flew their Director of Operations, Mary Dwyer, over to Belgium to offer support to the management and team. As Project Management experts, they know that detailed planning, determined execution and collaborative teamwork is the key to success. Aspira are proud to be associated with a team that has done so much already this year to champion those values.

Before flying to Belgium, Mary was in Turner’s Cross to congratulate Alan Bennett on setting a club record of 24 European appearances. Alan, a former Irish International has plenty of experience of the big occasion and knows that Irish teams can compete with – and beat – some of the high profile international names. Aspira support that view, 110%.

Mary reports back that the team is in good form, with no late injuries, and are focused and determined to keep the tie alive for the second leg next week. Meanwhile, back in Ireland, Aspira CEO Pat Lucey, is waiting patiently in the Turner’s Cross dressing room for the home game, still hoping for a call up after all these years…

Requirement Gathering – Overcoming Obstacles Along The Way

One of the crucial first stages of any project is the seeking out and to collect all-important business requirements. Establishing an entire set of needs at the beginning allows for superior planning, shorter delivery cycles, authentic estimates of project costs, along with
increased client satisfaction and the better adoption of the end product or service.

One of the main duties that a business analyst will perform is to successfully bridge the gap between the technical and business requirements. They are expected to fully comprehend the requirements of the company within the given context, then adjust these needs with the objectives and goals of the organisation. It is also essential that these results be communicated to either a development team, stakeholders or perhaps both.

In order to accomplish this successfully, the project requirements must be clearly and concisely written, in a way that is entirely comprehensible to both groups of people. It is expected that the business analyst, project manager or whoever is responsible for the analysis will have to deal with conflicting views and opinions from the stakeholders; there will frequently be challenges along the way to working out the exact plan and obtain a crystal clear picture of exact requirements.

1. Not defining the success criteria clearly
It is entirely natural for stakeholders to be aware that there are issues which need to be addressed, but not to fully comprehend what they require as a solution. One key element to help them to reach this point and address the issue is to break the project down into bitesize pieces. There are numerous collaboration modelling tools, which allow this – providing the clients with a high-level overview of the vision.
What is key, is to try to fully ascertain what they like, you can ask them to give you examples of products they prefer, and to elaborate on why they like them. Making the requirements fully quantifiable and conclusive.

 

2. Stakeholders may have a conflicting interest or priority
When introducing a new process, system or product, it is essential that it adheres to the requirements of multiple groups of stakeholders, these could be senior management, investors or even end users of the product. It is possible, and almost probable that these groups of people will have conflicting priorities or views on this. We have found one of the best ways to tackle this challenge, is to always have an assigned authority within the business. This is somebody who can take charge of the negotiations, and also who has the final say in making the decision. Without this person, it is often exceptionally challenging to resolve this type of conflict.
This part of gathering requirement is crucial, it ensures that any proposed terms are not out of scope, nor do they promote any individual agenda – as opposed to the overall company vision at the heart of the project.
3. Stakeholders who are over forceful or do not speak up
If you are dealing with this issue, rest assured – it is likely that it is nothing at all to do with your project. These issues are frequently experienced to be political issues within a business. People might even be afraid to get pinned down by expressing their views or solutions. Sometimes, the project may be of particular importance, and as such this will be driving everyone to want to be involved and have a say. Participation from stakeholders, along with active communication is a recipe for success when we look at the requirement gathering processes. Having these key people provide you with honest, open information will first mean you having to establish rapport and trust. Being well prepared for these meetings, listening whilst you are in them and learning from them will imply professionalism, interest and will also enable you to understand their challenges, which will enable to you focus on solving their issues.

4. Stakeholders may have a change of heart
From time to time, this can happen. It could be that the initial project requirements have not been entirely understood, or communicated, or perhaps, over the course of the project – they have evolved. Realistically, the only way you can approach this objective or challenge is to remain flexible and try to embrace the change. Any amendments will need to be correctly prioritised and there will most likely be new budgetary and timings which would need to be relayed and confirmed with the client before any modifications can take place.

5. Stakeholders insisting on a specific solution
This challenge will often surface when the stakeholders are limited with their technical knowledge in specific areas, if they had a particular technology in a past project work well for them, or perhaps, they are just unable to articulate in a concise manner what requirement they are needing to address. An ideal way to deal with this is to aim to divert their focus back to the definition of what the system should do. One way to do this would be to ask a question such as “if you were to have that system in place, which one of our problems would that specifically solve?”. Essentially it will be the technical team who work out how the system will do what it needs to, not the stakeholder.

For more information on Aspira’s Business Analysis services check out our website or contact us on info@aspira.ie

Project Management and the Self Destructing Project Update!

Social media is everywhere.

Of the 7.3 billion people on the planet, 31% or 2.3 billion people actively use social media to communicate, to share and to build a sense of community. In a parallel universe, some of the key drivers of Project Management are to communicate, to inform and to develop high performing teams. Given how popular and powerful social media has become, what will this mean for the way we manage projects?

Communication is considered to be the lifeblood of Project Management. The better the communication within a project, the better the outcome will be. Any tool that will help internal communication has to be seriously considered; particularly in today’s workplace where virtual project teams, spread all over the globe, are very common.

Some organisations already have begun to use enterprise-grade social media, although these business-focussed tools tend to be a little different to the tools that flourish in the wild. For example, Yammer is deployed as a business-focussed alternative to Facebook; various Instant Messaging tools such as Skype for Business take the place of WhatsApp and enterprise tools such as SocialCast are found in organisations as a replacement for microblogging tools such as Twitter.

The value of these social-media inspired tools is well known and this article does not intend to review those benefits in detail. Instead, I will reflect briefly on some key traits that will drive adoption of such tools within businesses and within project teams and I will highlight the important lessons we need to learn if we are to leverage the power of these tools to the potential.

Up until the 1980’s, staff sent and received their internal communications via paper using internal post – the Mail Room was the nerve centre of an organization. Then Email came in, and quickly became the dominant business communication channel. People of my generation started to use web-based email clients such as Hotmail back in the 90’s before they ever started work. Once those people entered the workforce, they were very comfortable with email, knew how to use it and indeed they expected it to be the primary communication choice in large organisations (apart from actual face to face communication – but that is a story for a different day!). The etiquette and rules of engagement when using email were understood by new employees before they even entered the workforce.

Fast forward to today’s new entrants into the workforce. These Millenials consider email to be from a bygone age. They are much more comfortable using more social media related tools. These are the people who will be managing large projects in five years time – and these people will expect to use the equivalent of Whatsapp, Facebook and Instagram to communicate their thoughts and messages to the project team. Moreover, the project managers of tomorrow and will be using tools such ooVoo (Group video chat), Vine (6 second video loops) and anonymous confessional apps such as Whisper, and SnapChat – the self-destructing message intended for short-lived communications.

The important lesson for us incumbents in the world of Project Management is not to learn the latest hot tools that new entrants are using in their personal lives, but to understand that when these people start working in project teams, they will not only be comfortable with social media tools – they will expect and demand that those tools are used. They will view emails to be as old fashioned and cumbersome as we now think of ink and quills and blotting paper. They will treat cumbersome corporate collaboration tools as being a pale imitations of the tools they normally use.

Organisations must understand this change is coming and must design and integrate better enterprise-level social media tools which mimic the ease-of-use and the user experience of the tools used every day by the new generation. Some key traits that have been proven to influence enterprise social media tools are ease of adoption, performance expectancy, social influence and team trust. These elements must be designed into the new set of enterprise social media tools if they are to gain traction. Additionally, effort must be spent to ensure that business social media tools reflect the reality of how social media is used out in the real world.

It may not be long now before Vine-like video loops are used in getting project updates from virtual teams; we may see use of confessional anonymous platforms to reports project issues and how long before we see self-destructing messages are utilised to deliver sensitive news – a great solution to the “don’t shoot the messenger” problem in organizations. It cannot be long until you are live micro-blogging a big deployment in your organisation because that is the way team members expect to receive updates on events in general. If adopting these new social media technologies helps people to be more comfortable in communicating openly within project teams, this will be a huge plus for an organization and it will lead to more successful projects.

For more information on the integration of social media into project management practise please refer to the recently published Strategic Integration of Social Media into Project Management Practice or drop me a line at jerry.giltenane@Aspira.ie